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April 2020

The Dead Sea Scrolls: Why Do They Fascinate People?

April 22 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

When the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered in 1947 by a Bedouin shepherd boy chasing a lost goat, they changed an awful lot about our understanding of the Bible. They were almost a thousand years older than any other manuscript, written in archaic Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek. The earliest archaeologists who worked at Qumran were Catholic priests who assumed it was the work of a celibate group of monks, and yet women were found buried in the large cemetery. The…

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The Dead Sea Scrolls: Why Do They Fascinate People?

April 29 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

When the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered in 1947 by a Bedouin shepherd boy chasing a lost goat, they changed an awful lot about our understanding of the Bible. They were almost a thousand years older than any other manuscript, written in archaic Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek. The earliest archaeologists who worked at Qumran were Catholic priests who assumed it was the work of a celibate group of monks, and yet women were found buried in the large cemetery. The…

Find out more »
May 2020

The Dead Sea Scrolls: Why Do They Fascinate People?

May 6 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

When the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered in 1947 by a Bedouin shepherd boy chasing a lost goat, they changed an awful lot about our understanding of the Bible. They were almost a thousand years older than any other manuscript, written in archaic Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek. The earliest archaeologists who worked at Qumran were Catholic priests who assumed it was the work of a celibate group of monks, and yet women were found buried in the large cemetery. The…

Find out more »

The Dead Sea Scrolls: Why Do They Fascinate People?

May 13 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

When the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered in 1947 by a Bedouin shepherd boy chasing a lost goat, they changed an awful lot about our understanding of the Bible. They were almost a thousand years older than any other manuscript, written in archaic Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek. The earliest archaeologists who worked at Qumran were Catholic priests who assumed it was the work of a celibate group of monks, and yet women were found buried in the large cemetery. The…

Find out more »
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